Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Game on Girls


HBO’s “comedy” Girls continues to delight the tragically hip with its “realistic” portrayal of the travails and troubles of rich white chicks in New York .  It’s kind of like a Junior Varsity Sex In The City, I suppose.  I caught the first couple of episodes out of morbid curiosity, and while I’m still waiting for teh funny, I did note several interesting observations relating to Game.  So while Girls is being heralded as a beacon of feminine wit and humor to the feminist crowd (whichever wave is most popular at the moment), in its quest for realism it might turn out to present some very intriguing insights for dudes who want to understand the intricacies of female sexual psychology and how to exploit it.

In trying to portray “realistic” sex stories about twentysomething beta girls, Girls inadvertently takes a big dose of Red Pill and accidentally shoves it down your throat in the name of chick comedy.  Among them:

1. Girls are either bored by their boyfriends, who are at fault for being too caring and sensitive and boring, or pissed off with their boyfriends for being self-involved, inconsiderate jerks.  In other words, Alphas for the fuck, Betas for the buck. And the girls of Girls are pissed off either way.  Maybe it’s them?

2. Gina Tingles Override Reason: Despite the fact that they don’t like self involved, inconsiderate jerks, “there’s something magnetic about their cockiness and the way they just don’t care. “ (Game Principal: SCOP #1: “The man who gives his emotional world away too easily robs women of the satisfaction of earning his love.”  If Adam wasn’t emotionally distant and presenting Hannah with regular gentle negs, then she would have zero interest in him because within female sexual psychology any dude who wants you that badly isn’t worth having . . . but the dude who barely tolerates your presence and makes you do kinky things you don’t necessarily like is the DUDE YOU MUST HAVE AT ALL COSTS.  We’ll return to this theme in a moment.)


3. The Girlfriend is more important than the Dude (“Hos Before Bros”).  Early on Hannah and Marnie (roomies and BFFs) are having the sort of fun-filled, emotionally bonding moment over how bad Marnie’s Beta-boy is, when he walks into the room and overhears their scorn.  And of course the girls immediately clam up – not so much out of embarrassment, but because this was an intimate moment between women that is more prized and valued than the romantic relationships they are in.  Dudes are pretty much “the enemy”, an enemy whose affirmation and validation they cannot live without.  Girlfriends, on the other hand, are the only true repository for emotional closeness and candid discussion.  Dudes just don’t seem to measure up as human beings.

4. The Relationship is more important than the Dude you’re in it with.  In the second episode Marnie (the pretty one) bitches out her boyfriend for essentially being a Nice Guy who cares too much about her opinions and feelings – which, of course, is a betrayal of the feminist principal which says that sensitive and caring dudes who kiss your ass are the preferred choice for mating.  When her boyfriend shaves his head without even consulting his girlfriend, in an apparent demonstration of defiant individualism, Marnie freaks again and treats him with loathing and disgust . . . until he reveals that he did it in sympathy for a chemo patient at work.  Instead of expressing, y’know, praise and admiration for such a noble and thoughtful sentiment, Marnie solipsistically attacks him for not telling her that first, which makes her look like an ass.  It’s his fault.  Not hers for bitching him out without learning the whole story, not hers for plowing headfirst into an emotional reaction without first considering rational alternatives . . . no, the Hamster intervenes, and turns her legitimate embarrassment as yet another reason to trash her boyfriend.  The whole point of his actions is, in her mind, an attempt to wound her and the Relationship – it’s all about her.  And how does she reward his caring, sensitive actions?  She goes out and nearly fucks the first guy who’s a jerk to her.  Classy.  But predictable.

5. Boys’ feelings don’t matter, compared to girls’ feelings.  Hannah confronts her jerky boyfriend about the fact that she has HPV and accuses him of giving it to her.  He claims he was tested and doesn’t have it, which is revealed to be a lie because there is no test, as women are gleefully pointing out.  (side note: while there is no hard-and-fast scientific screening test that can prove whether or not a dude has HPV, a common indicator is small white bumps on the penis which are revealed after coating it in a light vinegar solution.  It’s not conclusive, but you can make an educated guess that way.)

Regardless of whether or not he did have it, the brutal accusation that he gave it to her and the resultant (and completely predictable – if someone accuses you of giving them an STD and you didn’t, wouldn’t YOU be pissed off too?) anger he displays is secondary to how this affects Hannah.  Instead of apologizing for the accusation, her first reaction is predictable:  "Will you still have sex with me?"

That is, “will you still validate my femininity, even after I have so blatantly and unfairly insulted you?”

So when Adam replies, coldly: "When it's appropriate, sure," the claws come out.  Everyone hates Adam.  Why?  Because he’s giving Hannah exactly what she wants, a relationship with sex that elevates her position in the Matrix, with some mediocre sex on the side.  Hannah is just the kind of girl who would drop a dude who actually acted like he liked her like a hot horseshoe, because her self-esteem and Hamsterization has convinced her that any man who actually liked her and treated her well is not worthy enough to give her the validation that she desperately needs.

So when Hannah asks for a hug goodbye, he's too "busy" doing shoulder-stands and cycling his legs.  That is, he’s focusing on his body and distancing himself in the face of rejection, two perfectly appropriate male responses to an unwarranted emotional outburst like Hannah’s.  Only the women don’t see it that way.  The female critics have nearly universally castigated Adam as an irredeemable jerk, without the slightest sympathy for the fact that he has an utterly neurotic girlfriend who really has no clue about men at all, and only the scantest idea of how a relationship is supposed to work.

6. Chicks like jerks.  From Hannah’s insensitive boyfriend who uses her for sex to the new artist character, Jonathan, every single one of these chicks is ready to drop her panties for the first dude who doesn’t kiss her ass.  

Case in point: Marnie (the pretty solipsistic babe referenced above) glams up for a gallery opening where she meets a short, cocky caricature artist, Booth Jonathan.  She immediately starts in with some “I’m a huge fan of your work” when this Game-savvy dude interrupts her with one of the best conversational stop-thrust negs I’ve ever heard:

“Try and give less of a shit.”

In other words, he both appreciates her enthusiasm and mocks it with one sentence.  Add in the bonus points for spontaneity and bravado, give another for the use of profanity, and you can nearly see the character’s slug trails.  He’s a jerk, from the first words out of his mouth, and she eats it up.  Yet how is this Pavlovian sexual response Hamsterized by the critics?  “It’s just the kind of carelessness Marnie’s been looking for. It’s not someone like Adam who is pretentious in a way that isn’t earned — this artist is talented and accomplished, and Marnie finds his pretension attractive.”

So, to the mind of Girls, it’s okay to be a cocky bastard ... if you earn it by being talented and accomplished.  But if you’re just a cocky bastard (like Hannah’s boyfriend), then they’re going to feel bad as they fuck you.

But they’re still going to fuck you.

To re-emphasize the point, when Marnie (who has been responding to Jonathan’s flirting like a horny trained monkey) tries to pull the demure “You aren’t going to be able to kiss me tonight like you do with those other girls – I’m not that easy!” type of line on him, he takes his Game full court.  He gets in her face, dominantly backs her up against the door until he’s just inside her comfort zone, and while she’s still in flight/fight panic mode at the suddenness of the response (she was expecting a more mellow, beta-ish ‘that’s okay, I respect you too much for that’ type of line), he busts out with a completely Game-oriented bad ass line:

“The first time I fuck you, I might scare you a little. Because I’m a man, and I know how to do things.”  

He doesn’t kiss her (although it’s clear she wants him to) he doesn’t try to get her number, he doesn’t say another word.  He turns around and strides off into the evening.

And what does Marnie do?  How does she react to this brutally rude and presumptive burst of bravado?  Does she slap him?  Call him names?  Demand an apology?  Insist he respect her femininity?  Call her girlfriends, outraged and appalled, like a good feminist should?

No.  She finds the nearest public bathroom and masturbates to orgasm on the strength of Jonathan’s Alphatude.  

And any student of game knows that the moment he reappears in her life, despite her “commitment” to her “relationship” with her “nice guy boyfriend”, she’s willing to flush the whole thing down the toilet for a chance to ride on this particular baloney pony.  Indeed, she won’t be able to stop thinking about him, or the fact that he so aggressively doesn’t give a fuck about her or her feelings in the matter.

Pure Red Pill Alpha Game.

Of course the critics are appalled:


“It's not that a line like that has never worked, but the entire sequence felt, to me, like a man's take on what Marnie needs, i.e., "That filly wants breaking to harness!" Yes, people should stand up to Marnie, but 1) I don't care for the idea that that's a result of her gender, or that the opposite gender is what's required to "take her down a peg"; and 2) snideness and pat line delivery do not a man make in the first place. Maybe I'm overthinking this, but the cure for uptight-bitch-itis is not necessarily cock.”

Thus sayeth the Hamster.  But I think we know better.  If Marnie was getting her marshmallow properly toasted with her boyfriend the Nice Guy, then Jonathan’s adept Game wouldn’t work nearly as easily as it does.  Red Pill wisdom says that a woman who is having satisfying sex with a man she respects, she’s not going to rise to such bait.  

Other critics?  “Art pricks might say something like that to a girl, but they’re usually on drugs and they don’t look like Harry Potter when they do. Also, the Marnies that I know would have laughed at this line, whether out of nerves or just, wait, did you really just say that? As for the wall masturbating, I guess Marnie is way more sexual than anything we’ve ever seen of her before, or anything she’s ever said have suggested. The scene felt inauthentic.”

Yeah, right.  In Blue Pill Land, where women only like guys like . . . well, like Marnie’s boring, sensitive boyfriend, then masturbating after getting Gamed like that would be inauthentic.  But in the Red Pill reality, the fact is that it is entirely predictable.  Women see a strong Alpha display.  Women get wet.  Women indulge in a little serotonin break with a honeymoon with their hand.

How about:

“I would have personally punched the cocky guy when he said that comment before leaving. But it was also pretty fucking forward, no wonder she had to take care of that. (Though I thought she was actually going to cry at first.)”


“The "jizz in my pants" guy showing up as a ladies man and literally saying "The first time I fuck you, I might scare you a little, because I'm a man and I know how to do things" was just icing on the "what the hell is this show?" cake. “
“Oh man, that name. Of all the awful guys on Girls, Booth Jonathan is to me the most loathsome so far—though that sad dad that Jessa is clearly destined to sleep with has odious potential for sure.”


“First, I was confused by Marnie’s response to Booth. He seemed like such a little tight-jacketed douche—his come-on, “I’m a man and I know how to do things” was beyond obnoxious. And yet it drove her to masturbation. If she’s that starved for “aggressive” male attention, her problems run deeper than an overly nice boyfriend.”


“Leaving aside that I can’t see Jorma Taccone without thinking of him jizzing in his pants, this still seemed pretty skeezy—indeed, it apparently was inspired by a skeezeball whogot the line from a friend at Vice magazine. Did any of you buy this come-on?”


“It did seem fairly preposterous and out of left-field. (At first I wondered if Marnie had told him, off screen, about her wimpy boyfriend. Why else would he say that?) But its effectiveness on Marnie made dramatic sense. In the last episode, she told Charlie he should be able “do what he wants and not give a fuck” what she thinks about it (an odd thing to tell your boyfriend). And don’t forget that Booth Jonathan (cringing every time I read that name) is a very successful artist, obviously a huge part of his appeal to Marnie.”


“Jonathan seemed too much a fantasy of Marnie’s to be a real character. I’m glad that the show finally moved beyond its own provocatively male version of the whore/virgin dichotomy”

All of this points out the utter ignorance of Game (except by accident) on the part of most women and men . . . because a selection of those reviews above were from dudes (White Knighters, of course – who else would be watching this estrogenfest?).

In trying to be “real” and “authentic” Girls has point out some obvious (and embarrassing to feminism) Red Pill truths, such as female entitlement, hypergamy, gina tingles, and the kind of industrial-strength hamstring that drives most females these days.

To sum up, Girls teaches us:

1. Girls don’t know what they want and do not know how to handle a relationship. (Flakiness)
2. Girls’ ‘gina tingles override wisdom in most cases. (Hypergamy)
3. Girls think other girls are more important than the men in their lives. (Matrix)
4. Girls think that the Relationship is more important than the man. (Matrix)
5. Girls’ feelings matter more than boys’ feelings. (Solipsism)
6. Girls respond well to jerks, and spectacularly well to Alpha jerks. (Charisma)


Talk about a “victory lap” for feminism . . . no wonder the twentysomething dudes I know are so depressed about their girlfriends.


5 comments:

  1. sharp analysis plus entertaining read, thx

    seems like just about everything we witness these days -- from society or churches -- is a "Victory Lap for feminism" . . . whether it's Slutwalking or the latest female-empowering "laws" passed by our "leaders"

    females and their governments are sure taking great pleasure in the disenfranchisement and destruction of maleness

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  2. You do realize that Lena Dunham (the actress who plays Hannah) is the creator, writer, director and producer of Girls? So, obviously she is using the show to make a statement about how clueless the girls of this generation are. Otherwise, she wouldnt have the story lines following the red pill ideals so closely; it would be fairy tale BS with the nice guy wins nice girl rom-com ideals, cue sunset.

    And a minor but important point: Adam is not her boyfriend. He's her f-buddy. She may wish he were her boyfriend but he's not. What disgusts me about their interactions isn't how he "treats her" per se, it's the fact that she seems utterly dissatisfied in bed and if he's not nice and he's a lame lay who cares nothing about her achieving her O... why be with him? Answer: cripplingly low self-esteem.

    She lets him use her as a hole in the mattress and she doesnt even get her cookies too. I've never understood having a physical relationship w/o getting off. She needs to run (not walk) away fast! Her love life would greatly improve if she joined a gym got down to the requisite size 2 women are required to be in order to date; and head to the nearest Sephora so that the make-up artists can improve her face. Not to mention buy new clothes and change the hair.

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  3. Excellent review, Ian.

    Thank you.

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  4. When something is good, it is often misunderstood, like those who hated Larry David's show for being so "mean" or Seinfeld for being too "white".

    Clearly Lena Dunham has not only an excellent head for dialogue, the whole storyline shows she knows Game in all its glory. Maybe she doesn't approve of it, but she knows it. And her character Hannah is no hero(ine) by any stretch.

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